The Rule of Law

Law

Articles on the Rule of Law

The concept of the Rule of Law has many facets. It encompasses many different things, and different people privilege different aspects. For some, the Rule of Law is defined as the impartial application of a well-drafted statute. Others define it as a stable constitution. Aristotle contrasted the Rule of Law with the rule of men. He argued that the latter is more secure than the former.

Legal systems

In legal systems, the state or government creates and enforces laws. There are hundreds of different legal systems around the world. International law is especially important at a global level, and is often created by an agreement among sovereign states. Some transnational organizations, such as the United Nations, have developed their own legal systems. There are over 180 sovereign states in the United Nations Organization, and many of these states are federal, meaning that they have their own laws and constituent parts.

Accessibility

Accessibility law is a federal and state law that requires web pages to be accessible to people with disabilities. This law covers websites, web content, and public services. It applies to federal government websites, as well as to educational institutions and private businesses. Other state and city laws require websites to be accessible to people with disabilities. In New York City, the Human Rights Law prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities. This law also protects people with less severe impairments. The city’s Building Code also requires accessibility features in all new buildings and renovations.

Magna Carta

Magna Carta is a medieval document that defines our rights as free men and women. It is the basis of many rights that we enjoy today. The original document is still a popular symbol of liberty and is frequently quoted by campaigners and politicians. The legal community holds it in high regard, and Lord Denning has described it as the most important constitutional document in history. It represents the foundation for individual freedom against despots. In the 21st century, four copies of the document still exist. Two are in the British Library, and the rest are in private ownership in the United States and Australia.

Separation of powers

Separation of powers in law is a concept that helps maintain the balance of power in our government. It defines how the three branches of government exercise their respective responsibilities. The legislative branch makes laws and the executive branch enforces those laws. Executive branch officials must be confirmed by the Senate, and the courts rule on whether executive actions are constitutional.

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